Scotland Did Not Always Give Sports a Sporting Chance

King James I Banned football soccer in Scotland
Scotland is known for its passionate football (American soccer) fans, and it is recognized as the birthplace of golf and home to the most famous golf courses in the world. Did you know that both sports were once illegal throughout the land? Continue reading

And the Game Goes On… and On… and On….

World record for longest games basketball baseball Minecraft Mario Kart tennis
Fans of sporting events are known to be so committed to their team that they will endure years of poor performance, shell out big money for season tickets, sit through horrible weather to watch an event, and wear their team’s colors on every possible occasion.

Sometimes fans also have to be prepared to wait. And wait. And wait.  Continue reading

Football: the Sport of the Brave or of the Wimps? You Decide

Theodore Roosevelt Julius Caesar football too violent not violent enough

US President Theodore Roosevelt considered outlawing American football because it was too violent.

Roman Emperor Julius Caesar banned a game similar to football because it was too gentle.

The Christmas Truce of 1914

 

British and German soldiers lay down their weapons for a few hours and celebrate Christmas
British and German soldiers lay down their weapons for a few hours and celebrate Christmas

On Christmas Eve, 1914, many German and British troops sang Christmas carols to each other across the lines, and at certain points the Allied soldiers even heard brass bands joining the Germans in their joyous singing.

At the first light of dawn on Christmas Day, some German soldiers emerged from their trenches and approached the Allied lines across no-man’s-land, calling out “Merry Christmas” in their enemies’ native tongues. At first, the Allied soldiers feared it was a trick, but seeing the Germans unarmed they climbed out of their trenches and shook hands with the enemy soldiers. The men exchanged presents of cigarettes and plum puddings and sang carols and songs. There was even a documented case of soldiers from opposing sides playing a good-natured game of soccer.

Some soldiers used this short-lived ceasefire for a more somber task: the retrieval of the bodies of fellow combatants who had fallen within the no-man’s land between the lines.

The so-called Christmas Truce of 1914 came only five months after the outbreak of war in Europe and was one of the last examples of the outdated notion of chivalry between enemies in warfare. It was never repeated—future attempts at holiday ceasefires were quashed by officers’ threats of disciplinary action—but it served as heartening proof, however brief, that beneath the brutal clash of weapons, the soldiers’ essential humanity endured.

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