Forget About Dog Years — What About Planetary Years?

Pluto discovered 1930 still not completed one full orbit

A planetary year is defined as the time it takes for that planet to make one complete orbit around the sun. Neptune was discovered on September 23, 1846. In terms of planetary years, it turned one year old on July 12, 2011, when it completed its first full orbit since its discovery. Continue reading

College Students Rejoice: Pizza For Every Meal

pizza 30% daily nutrition

In news that is sure to excite college students everywhere, a team of Scottish scientists announced the development of a pizza that is healthy enough to eat at every meal. Continue reading

Keep One Hand Free to Slap the Inventor

Bad ideas inventions fire alarm traps hand

We all know that pulling a fire alarm as a prank shows serious lack of judgment. When it comes a lack of judgment, however, few could surpass the inventor of the Fire Box Trap. Continue reading

Whether You Have ADD or Are an Introvert, the Isolator May be For You

Hugo Gersback The Isolator Science and Invention magazine
The above pictures were featured in the July 1925 issue of Science and Invention magazine.

Ritalin has only been available since the 1950’s, but people have had difficulty with Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD) forever. Inventor Hugo Gernsback offered his solution for highly-distractable people when he invented The Isolator in 1925. Continue reading

How Long to Walk the Planck?

Measurements of time Planck Time
One of the smallest units of measurement of time is the Planck time (tP). It is the time required for light to travel, in a vacuum, a distance of one Planck length, approximately 5.39 × 10−44 s.

To give you an idea of how small this is, in one second there are more Planck times than there have been seconds since the Big Bang, which occurred 14 billion years ago.

Close Doesn’t Count in Patent Race 

Alexander Graham Bell controversy Elisha Gray telephone invention patent
Elisha Gray (left) and Alexander Graham Bell (right)

February 14, 1876 was a big day for Elisha Gray. That was the day he filed his application for a patent for his revolutionary new invention. His device promised to unite the world as never before by allowing a person to speak to and hear another person miles away by sending the voices through a tiny electrical wire. That miraculous device would be called the telephone.  Continue reading

Letting the Dead Rest in Peace

coffin torpedo grave robbers body snatchers

Grave robbery was not something that just showed up in Frankenstein stories. In the last half of the 19th century, human corpses were in high demand by medical schools, and the body snatching market grew in response. No one’s remains were considered off limits. Extraordinary measures had to be taken to protect the body of President Abraham Lincoln.  One notable person whose body was stolen was John Scott Harrison, the only man who was both the son of a US President (William Henry Harrison) and the father of a US President (Benjamin Harrison). Outrage over the theft of his mortal remains sparked the first landmark legislation to address the growing problem. Continue reading