Not Only an Assassin; He’s a Book Thief, Too

As if assassinating President John F. Kennedy weren't offensive enough, Lee Harvey Oswald has yet another black mark against his name. According to the records of the Dallas Public Library, Oswald checked out the book The Shark and the Sardines by Juan José Arévalo. It was already overdue at the time of Oswald's death.

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Court Rules that Marvel Mutants Are Not Human

Mutants are not human and are not worth as much as humans. So was the ruling of the United States Court for International Trade, not in the Marvel Universe where mutants have to fight for equality and basic human rights, but in the real world case of Toy Biz, Inc. v. United States. The Harmonized... Continue Reading →

How Did the Hindenburg Disaster Nearly Destroy Marvel Comics?

The unexpected explosion of the Hindenburg on May 6, 1937, left an enduring mark on history. Thirty-six people were killed as the massive airship attempted to dock at Naval Air Station Lakehurst in New Jersey. The disaster changed the lives of those who were involved, and it brought about the end of the airship era of... Continue Reading →

Children? I Do Not Like Them, Sam-I-Am!

Theodore Geisel, better known by his pen name, Dr. Suess, wrote more than 40 beloved children's books. With such classics as The Cat in the Hat, Green Eggs and Ham, and How the Grinch Stole Christmas, Dr. Suess earned an enduring place in the hearts of children everywhere. That's a pretty good accomplishment for a... Continue Reading →

The Cavalry Charges Into History

Few military maneuvers instill as many thoughts of heroism and daring as the cavalry charge. Rushing at full speed against an onslaught of enemy forces has inspired such poetic works Alfred, Lord Tennyson's as "The Charge of the Light Brigade," and have launched political careers, as did the Battle of San Juan Hill for U.S.... Continue Reading →

Judge Rules on Lawsuit 26 Years Late, After Finding File in His Attic

As far as landmark judicial decisions go, the mineral rights case of Ayers v Rubow is hardly a candidate to change the face of established jurisprudence. When Toole County, Montana Judge Ronald McPhillips issued his ruling in the case in the summer of 2009, it is doubtful few would have noticed, except for a couple of curious... Continue Reading →

20 Quirks and Strange Habits — The Weird Side of Famous Writers

Readers of this site will not be surprised that famous writers have their own niche in the realm of eccentricity. Whether it be their unusual jobs, their acerbic wit, or creepy predictions, the more famous the author, the more exaggerated the quirkiness. Now, thanks to Writer and Blogger Jack Milgram,  we now have documented the... Continue Reading →

The Time Virginia Woolf Scammed the British Navy

  The pride and joy of the British Navy was the HMS Dreadnought, its most powerful battleship. That's why, despite the last-minute notice, the ship's commander was only too happy to accommodate a tour for the Prince of Abyssinia and his entourage. The date of February 7, 1910. The sailors of the Dreadnought were dressed in... Continue Reading →

Et tu, Next Breath?

One of the most famous assassinations in history took place on March 15, 44 BC. Julius Caesar was attacked by a group of Roman senators and stabbed to death. William Shakespeare famously records his last words as, “Et tu, Brute? Then fall Caesar!” (Julius Caesar). Others say his last words were Greek, “Καί σύ, τέκνον.”... Continue Reading →

Where Did the Knock Knock Joke Start? Verily, the Answer May Surprise Thee

William Shakespeare did more than write the most famous plays and sonnets in English literature and contribute more than 1,700 words to the English language.  He can also claim credit for inventing one of the most popular forms of humor: the knock knock joke.The date was 1606, and the venue was Macbeth, Act 2, Scene 3:... Continue Reading →

The Dragon that Almost Ended the Lord of the Rings

English is a language of exceptions, with few concrete rules. When it comes to adjectives, however, there is a very specific hierarchy most English speakers know, instinctively, must be followed to avoid utter confusion. Those rules may be broken only at great risk -- including the risk of derailing one of the greatest literary geniuses in history.... Continue Reading →

This Is Why Teens Generally Don’t Get to Choose Their Names

In 2008 19-year-old George Garratt legally changed his name to "Captain Fantastic Faster Than Superman Spiderman Batman Wolverine Hulk And The Flash Combined." He said he wanted to "be unique." Not to be outdone, these guys went a step further a couple of years later.  They still didn't match the complexity of this fellow, whose given... Continue Reading →

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