Meet Michael Malloy: The Man Who Wouldn’t Die

  If things get so desperate for you that you contemplate killing someone to collect on insurance, be sure you find a cooperative victim. That lesson was learned the hard way by the men who tried to kill Michael Malloy. Tony Marino, Joseph "Red" Murphy, Francis Pasqua, Hershey Green, and Daniel Kriesberg came up with a... Continue Reading →

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Lincoln’s Dog Followed Him Even in Death

Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865) knew the value of a faithful friend. Maybe that's why he acquired a yellow mixed-breed dog in 1855 when he lived in Springfield, Illinois. The future President named the dog Fido, and they quickly became inseparable. Their connection would unite them in life -- and in death.  Fido accompanied Lincoln everywhere in... Continue Reading →

The Getty Kidnapping: How Much is a Grandson’s Life Worth?

  Jean Paul Getty (1892-1976) was one of the wealthiest man in the world. In 1966 the Guinness Book of Records named him as the wealthiest man on the planet with a fortune of $1.2 billion ($9.1 billion in 2017). He earned his fortune in the oil business, and in 1996 The Wealthy 100 ranked him as the 67th... Continue Reading →

Scotland Did Not Always Give Sports a Sporting Chance

Scotland is known for its passionate football (American soccer) fans, and it is recognized as the birthplace of golf and home to the most famous golf courses in the world. Did you know that both sports were once illegal throughout the land? King James I outlawed football with the Football Act of 1424. It was... Continue Reading →

Was His Birth a Clue to the Madness That Would Come?

John Hinckley, Jr. will be forever remembered as the man who attempted to assassinate President Ronald Reagan on March 30, 1981. He was found not guilty by reason of insanity and confined to St. Elizabeth's Hospital in Washington, DC for treatment for narcissistic and schizotypal personality disorder and major depressive disorder. In an ironic bit... Continue Reading →

Springtime at the Gallows

Justice in the Old West was quick, decisive, and occasionally poetic. Witness this colorful death sentence issued in United States v Gonzales (1881), U.S. District Court, New Mexico Territory. Jose Manuel Miguel Xavier Gonzales, in a few short weeks, it will be spring. The snows of winter will flee away, the ice will vanish, and the annual... Continue Reading →

Not Really a Surgeon? What Was the First Clue?

It never hurts to check the credentials of anyone who is going to be performing surgery on you. Just ask the San Francisco woman who asked Carlos Guzmangarza to perform a liposuction on her. As it turns out, Guzmangarza wasn't a surgeon and never held a medical license; he was pretending to be a physician's... Continue Reading →

The 20-Year Flight of the Killer Bullet

   Sometimes you just can't escape fate. Take Henry Ziegland, for example. When he broke up with his girlfriend in 1893, she committed suicide. Her brother blamed Ziegland for his sister's death and vowed revenge. He confronted Ziegland, pulled a gun, and took a shot at him. Fortunately for Ziegland, the bullet only grazed his... Continue Reading →

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