Repeated Failure = MC2


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Most of us take Albert Einstein’s name as synonymous with genius, but he didn’t always show such promise. Einstein did not speak until he was four and did not read until he was seven, causing his teachers and parents to think he was mentally handicapped, slow and anti-social. Eventually, he was expelled from school and was refused admittance to the Zurich Polytechnic School. He attended a trade school for one year and was finally admitted to the University. He was the only one of his graduating class unable to get a teaching position because no professor would recommend him. One professor labeled him as the laziest dog they ever had in the university. The only job he was able to get was an entry-level position in a government patent office. A woman he was dating left him, saying she was interested in a “smarter man.”

 

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One thought on “Repeated Failure = MC2

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  1. Wow! If only they could have seen inside his mind to view what was brewing inside there. Sometimes quiet introspection breeds the best insight. I have always tried to remember that about my students especially after having three rather intelligent boys two of whom blossomed later in their school careers. I wonder why we have traditionally viewed the loud and talkative as the more intelligent. I saw it in my own schooling as I was growing up. Very often it is the quiet, seeminly introverts who end up shining. They think longer before speaking and acting. Great article.

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